Of Blood and Bones

Books

Shadow magick occupies a critical role in the rich history of witchcraft, and it continues to draw strong interest from contemporary practitioners despite the limited information that is available. This book explores misunderstood topics such as ethically collecting and using animal parts and bones, blood magick, dark moon energy, hexing, scrying, dark deities, graveyard dirt, spells to assist the crossing of a dying loved one, and much more. With a strong focus on ethics, author Kate Freuler provides much-needed information and hands-on techniques to help you strengthen your life, connect to nature, protect yourself (and your kith and kin), and know yourself in a deep way.

Customer Reviews

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K
K.T.
For those serious about Shadow Work

I ordered my copy of "Of Blood and Bones" from Rite of Ritual in Calgary. It arrived quickly, was beautifully packaged, and was accompanied by a lovely bookmark. I was quite eager to dig in, so I set aside the other two books I was reading and got started. This book deals with hot button topics in the Pagan community, specifically hexing, cursing, and binding, as well as procuring, cleaning, and preserving animal parts to use in various aspects of your practice. If these subjects are something you wish to avoid or feel are “wrong”, this book is not for you. If, on the other hand, you are interested in cultivating a dark moon-centered practice or simply wish to embark (or continue) on a path that includes shadow work, you will certainly benefit from what you find here. As always, I was hoping to find Baba Yaga included but wasn’t overly surprised by Her absence. For the sake of transparency, I would like to point out that the author writes about the Morrigan, using the Maiden, Mother, Crone analogy. Based on my research, as well as my experience, I do not agree. Author Morgan Daimler explains it best. When asked if the Morrigan is a triple Goddess, Morgan writes: “My answer – In the modern neo-pagan sense of a maiden-mother-crone goddess no. In the older sense of a deity who appeared with two other deities then yes as we often see the Morrigan acting with two others, usually her two sisters Badb and Macha. When we see triple deities in Irish myth they are usually age equals and often siblings who either share a main purview or act together to accomplish a goal, so by that measure the Morrigan, Badb, and Macha would qualify.” The book contains a great many spells for various circumstances, which can be used as-is, or expanded upon and modified quite easily to suit whatever you hope to accomplish. I found the section on “Creepy Crawlies” in Chapter 6 especially interesting, as I have yet to find another book that focuses on insects and their uses in magic. I also gleaned a lot of information and inspiration from the section dealing with graveyards. I personally have no interest in procuring/cleaning my own bones, so I appreciate the fact they were able to provide the reader with two reputable sources. If you are serious about Shadow Work and in need of more ideas, information, and inspiration, this book is a great addition to your library.